Checkers


Another image taken at Patti’s 1880’s Settlement. (See previous post.) I loved the multicolored thread that was woven in the fabric checkerboard; colored thread I didn’t notice until I opened the file on the computer. The image made me ponder, and eventually research, the theme of checkers.

Do people still play checkers? It’s been a long time since I’ve played. I do have memories of playing checkers with my grandfather and also remember how much fun the kids at school would have playing checkers while listening to music on “free day.” Did we every play checkers at home while our son was growing up? I don’t remember. Perhaps I should make sure we have a checkers board here and maybe we should teach the game to our grandchildren.

What memories do you have of playing checkers? Feel free to share them with me.

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Wiswell’s Checker’s Proverbs (borrowed from here)

While reading these, I found myself thinking about photography, or even life for that matter. I will share only a portion of the many featured at the above link.

A BETTER PERSPECTIVE:
Years ago, I discovered that by standing up and looking at the position from a distance, I got a better understanding of the game.
This helped me a great deal.

A CLEAN SLATE:
After you lose a tough game, there is only one thing to do, set them up and start all over again.

A COMMON FAILING:
One of the greatest errors in Chess or Checkers is to think you have everything under control.

A DOUBTING THOMAS:
If you want to be certain of your position, you must begin by doubting it.

A MASTER’S TRIPOD:
Some players have ability and knowledge, but lack discipline; without the third leg the tripod falls.

A MOVE AT A TIME:
You walk a mile a step at a time; you play a game a move at a time and you must win a tournament a round at a time.
Chess and Checker matches and tournaments require a great deal of patience.
This reminds me of a saying: How do you eat an elephant, a bite at a time!

A ROSE GARDEN:
You can’t harvest winning games, if you haven’t planted the seeds of victory.

A WELCOME WIN:
A blunder by your opponent in checkers obligingly covers a multitude of your sins.

BODY LANGUAGE:
When you are in questionable position, don’t alert your opponent by twisting and turning, but look confident and ride out the storm.

BRILLIANTCY?:
Sometimes when I win a beautiful game of checkers, I think I am either a genius or I’m lucky and I know I’m not a genius.

BUILD WELL:
A good game, like a good house, must have a strong foundation.

CHANGE OF PLANS:
There are checker games where you must change the battle plan in the midst of the battle. For some, that is psychologically impossible and they go down to defeat.

EN PASSANT:
Victory makes us poets; defeat makes us philosophical.

GOOD WINS AND GOOD LOSSES:
You can’t possibly win every checkers game, so try to lose respectably or even brilliantly.

HAPPY ENDINGS:
A good move may not seem to pay off in the opening or in the middle game, but it will show its worth in the ending.

HE ALSO SERVES:
The master knows exactly the right time to do nothing.

IMPROVISATION:
Masters are like generals; it takes an emergency to reveal their genius.

INTUITION:
What your instinct tells you, your brain should follow.

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER:
Knowledge alone cannot make a player, but lack of knowledge can surely unmake one.

LOOKING AHEAD:
You make a blunder in a checker game for one of two reasons:
1. You were not looking far enough ahead.
2. You were looking too far ahead.

LOOKING BACK:
Exploring the lines of yesterday’s masters may be as important as knowing today’s latest moves.

MEMORY MACHINES:
Don’t try to rely solely on the books, for your memory isn’t good enough: try a little understanding.

NEW IDEAS WIN NEW GAMES:
Your manuscript needs a continuous flow of new cooks and ideas.
It should be a living, breathing document.
Start one today.

NO-RISK POLICY?:
There is nothing more dangerous than a lack of caution, unless, perhaps, it’s too much caution.

OLD BECOMES NEW:
The older the play is, the more apt it will be new to your opponent.
I have won more checkers games with ancient lines than with today’s latest developments.

ORIGINAL THOUGHT:
The player who remains slave to the books will not become master.

PATIENCE:
A little knowledge is a dangerous thing and this is especially true of Chess and Checkers.
It will be months and years before you see the light, but the long wait will be rewarded.

POINT OF VIEW:
Don’t worry about how far ahead you can see, just make sure you’re looking in the right direction.

REASONABLE:
Your intuition may, at times, lead you to the right move, but it won’t really help until you find out why it works.

RESILIENCE:
Your best quality is not in never losing, but in losing and coming back every time you lose.

ROLLERCOASTER:
When you sit down to play a master, fasten your seat belts, for it’s apt to be a bumpy road ahead.

SEIZE THE MOMENT:
A passive move is best met with an aggressive reply or an opportunity and the game, may be lost.

SHOCK TREATMENT:
A good scare may eventually help you to make a good score.

SONDHEIM AND SHAKESPEARE:
Don’t let your love for the game of checkers keep you from listening to some good music or reading a great book every day.

STICK-TO-IT-IVE-NESS:
Some players possess hardly any talent except perseverance and occasionally they become champions.

STRIKE:
When the time is right, you must seize the moment or forever hold your peace.

THE ATTRACTION:
Chess and Checkers must be learned and relearned, over and over again. That’s what holds us, often for a lifetime!

THE BOTTOM LINE:
(1) Knowledge is not much good without wisdom and wisdom is not much good without knowledge.
You need both to be a winner.
(2) A game without danger, doubt or defeat would hardly be worth playing.
You must risk the slings and arrows of warfare to enjoy.
(3) A gross mistake is a hundred and forty four times worse than an ordinary mistake.
(4) Never say die.
Good checkers players may resign, but they never give up.
(5) The easiest way to solve a tough problem is nearly always wrong.

THE ILLUSION:
You are in the greatest danger when your game appears the safest.

THE MOVE IS THE MESSAGE:
Every time your opponent moves he tells you something, but you must listen closely.

THE NEW LOOK:
Sometimes originality is just a new way of looking at an old line of play.

THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES:
You must learn to pause and study the position closely as it will save you from many a defeat.

THE QUIET MASTERS:
The greater the players, the more they observe and the less they say; they file away the best play for future rainy days. File away your good play and be ready for ‘The Day’.

THE RECIPE:
After winning a good checkers game, I always ask myself:
‘Where did I go right?’

THE RIGHT MIXTURE:
Every player needs confidence with a dash of self-criticism and scepticism.

THE RISING STAR:
Move by move, game by game, match by match, tournament by tournament, that’s how you become an expert, a master or even a grand master.
Go for it!

THE THREE I’S:
I don’t think that the programmed knowledge of the computer will make the individual player an expert or a master. What really helps us improve is our intelligence, our imagination and our intuition.

THE UNBEATEN PATH:
The conformist expert will probably draw many games, but the non-conformist expert will probably win many games and become a master.

THE UNEXAMINED GAME:
Little errors untended, I’ve discovered too often, have a way of turning into big ones, especially in games of checkers where one is a little too confident.

TODAY AND TOMORROW:
The styles of play may vary, but the basic ideas of winning and drawing in checkers remain constant.

UNCERTAINTY IS CERTAIN:
If you fear the unknown, the unexplored and the unpublished, don’t play chess or checkers!

V FOR VICTORY:
Vision, plus versatility and valor lead the Vanguard.

YOUR MANUSCRIPT:
The player who records his losses today, won’t repeat them tomorrow.

ZOOLOGY:
A good checkers player should be part fox, part elephant, part bloodhound and part mule.

The site that I borrowed these Proverbs from is fascinating! Check out a couple of pages that captured my attention:

Checkers Photo Album

Checkers Post Cards From Around The World

And, many other fun, informative, inspirational information at The Checkers Chest.

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This entry was posted in photograph, still life, Sue Henry Photography and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Checkers

  1. juliemcleod says:

    It’s kind of sad that checkers has become a thing of the past. I think board games of any type are wonderful family activities. We have a set amongst our board games at the cottage but the kids never play. They do play chess though.

    Old checkerboards are very collectible, by the way, so if you find any of those in your attic, don’t let them go!

  2. JRP says:

    I love checkers and I don’t think I will ever stop loving it. I do think you should teach the grandchildren. Games like this and backgammon and chess should always be passed down through the generations in my opinion.

    I’ve never seen a woven chess board before…how wonderful is that!

    I have fond memories of playing chess w/ my sister growing up. I’m 99% sure she is the one who taught me how to play.

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